Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House

Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House

We, at Mimi Berlin, came to know about Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House via the Salone del Mobile 2017. On Instagram; we didn’t attend the Design Week this year because we missed our flight.  So this week we will be posting about venues, designs and other places we feel we really missed out on.

Image of yellow Futuro house via artsy.net if you are interested in trends spotting go to this site for some trend watching as well.

This flying saucer type of building is something we really wanted to see in real life. A yellow version stood in front of the Louis Vuitton Fondation at the Palazzo Bocconiin in Milan, where the newest designs for the Objets Nomades Collection were on display.

The Futuro House was designed in 1968 by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen. It was commissioned as a portable “holiday house” or ski chalet. Because it would be used in a mountainside setting, the structure needed to be easy to transport to the site, low maintenance and shed snow easily. The final design of the Futuro House met all those criteria. It’s just over 26 feet in diameter and came completely equipped with ctom furnishings that fit the interesting shape of this house. (read more at futurohouse.net)

Hiring the Futuro. Why think outside the box, when you can think inside a circle? Various forward looking companies and institutions have already taken the opportunity to use the  Futuro House as an inspirational and unique meeting or event space. “more info at futurohouse.co.uk

An other website devoted to documenting the history of the Futuro House and the current status and whereabouts of the remaining examples. thefuturohouse.com

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Le Corbusier’s Immeuble Molitor in Paris

Le Corbusier’s Immeuble Molitor in Paris

Le Corbusier (born Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret designed and built an eight stories high apartment block in the Boulogne-sur-Seine quarters in Paris. The “Immeuble Molitor” flat was realized between 1931 and 1934, it was the first ever residence with an entirely glass front. Le Corbusier lived and worked in the penthouse apartment/studio until he passed away in 1965.

Photography by Oliver Martin-Gambier © FLC/ADAGP/OMG Courtesy of the Fondation Le Corbusier

You can visit the apartment on Saturdays, we haven’t yet but Matilda Bathurst did, click this link to read her story. The address is: 24 Nungesser-et-Coli, Paris 75016.
fondationlecorbusier.fr

Compact Living in Hong Kong

Benny Lam photographed the tiny rooms, and it’s residents, in Hong Kong’s Grass Roots Living situations. “Grass Roots Living symbolizes the average households living in large public housing complexes in urban or new town areas. In many cases, parents, children and the elderly live together.” (srce). The result of Benny Lams’s work was exhibited under the name “Trapped” in 2014 and was hosted by the Society for Community Organization (SoCO).

We, at Mimi Berlin, spent hours looking at these photo’s, there is so much to see!
They also bring us just enough out of our own comfort-zone, which we like; it opens up unknown possibilities. We started wondering if we could live in such a small space. Would or could we live compact if we moved to Hong Kong?

We like the hustle and bustle of city life and want to be in the middle of that, in Hong Kong we would have to move to a so called Compact City Life neighborhood. Next to public Grass Roots Living you also have similar dwellings in Compact City Life neighborhoods (srce), with private owned housing. It is said that apartments (studios? units?) in Hong Kong are, on average, 50 cents higher per square foot than the estimated average of a New York City rental. Keeping that in mind:
If we moved to this crowded city we’d probably have to live the Compact City Life as well (liking it but spending as little time as possible at home).

(images via hk.localiiz.com)

 

Bettie Ball

Hi I am Bettie Ball

I was crowned Space Queen in the fifties,
it was probably the most memorable moment in my life.
Up till then, my everyday life was about turning bowling balls
at the bowling ball workshop.
When I became Space Queen they attached a Pink Space house to my house.
Which I use for entertaining visitors, to keep my legend alive.
bettie ball
photographer unknown (via greatgrottu)bettie ball
photocredits armorer77 (img via go2gbo)

unnamed house, place unknown photocredits Anton Lepashov (img via chewbukka)betty ballTemporary installation for the W/ Project Space in New York by Leong Leong (img via suckerpunchdaily)

Meet the other mimi characters HERE

Ravel Residence Student Housing

Ravel Residence Student HousingRavel Residence Student Housing

The Ravel Residence is a student community building situated at the Zuidas in Amsterdam, designed by John Bosch/Oeverzaaijer in 2012, construction of this modular building has started in the autumn of 2013 and was done by Jan Snel (tr; John Quick).
Although we live in Amsterdam, yesterday was the first time the building caught our eye, no wonder; it has just been completed.
We like it! It’s design is unusual by Amsterdam standards.
5 floors, with 800 apartments, covered with we don’t now how much, but many round windows framed in white plastic. The Ravel complex also houses commercial services such as a supermarket, grand café, temporary employment agency, cycle repair and launderette and on the roof there is space for urban farming and a basketball field. The rent for one dwelling is €495,- per month, but as we speak they are all rented out.
The funny thing is it will only be used for 12 years…..Why? The building of Ravel Residence was commissioned by Verweij Mungra Vastgoed BV. They rent small pieces of land from the city of Amsterdam for a period of time to build flexible student accommodations on, in order to eliminate the housing shortage for students and to make a living for themselves. So far team Verweij Mungra, Jan Snel and Oeverzaaijer has 2 student housing buildings in their portfolio.

(photocredits; JW Kaldenbach)

Inside the Home of Gae Aulenti

Designer-architect Gae Aulenti lived in Milan until her death in 2012 at age 84. Photographer Leslie Williamson got an exclusive peek at Aulenti’s furniture-stuffed flat for her new book, Modern Originals.

(images by Leslie Williamson via dwell)

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