M.E.N. presents: ES TUT MIR LEID – Ich habe mich verwählt

M.E.N. presents: ES TUT MIR LEID – Ich habe mich verwählt

M.E.N. are Maartje Janse, Elysanne Schuurman and Nikki Duijst; three female fashion designers. With their shared artistic visions and values they decided to work in a collective: Studio M.E.N. They presented their debut fashion collection in juli 2017 during Mercedes-Benz FashionWeek Amsterdam. Their show was made possible by the Amsterdams Fundfor the Arts and Stichting Stokroos.

 

(image credits CATWALK AMSTERDAM Team Peter Stigter.)

For their first collection M.E.N. placed traditional roles of men and women out of it’s original context which resuted in; well feminine-evening-sports-wear-gowns The clothes are made with van stock materials and in cooperation with Reblend, Meester Opleiding Coupeur, SLA, Textilelab Amsterdam, Makerversity en de ARC Amsterdam Lowlanders, the latter being a Dutch Rugbyteam.

Facebook: @MENofficialfashion/Instagram: @m_e_n_studio

See more Amsterdam Fashionweek /July 2017 HERE on Mimi Berlin’s blog

 

 

Alternative Gender Status: Two Spirits

Alternative Gender Status: Two Spirits

Before Christianity hit, what is nowadays, the USA the Native Americans used to know more than two genders, they came up with about five. We feel that is such a great concept; it seems like less fuss to have more genders than only two, more accurate and even more sophisticated. All these ancient genders can be compared to todays LBGTQ (but they are a) Community and, as we all know, are not seen as actual genders like the Two Spirited persons.

Alternative Gender Status: Two Spirits

<We’wha, a Zuni Lhamana (Two-Spirit), circa 1886. (photographer unknown The Library at The College of Staten Island of the City University of New York)

We’wha (1849–1896) was a Zuni Native American from New Mexico. She was the most famous lhamana, a traditional Zuni gender role, now described as mixed-gender or Two-Spirit. Read the story of We’wha here on Wikipedia

“Two Spirits refers to a person who has both a masculine and a feminine spirit, and is used by some First Nations people to describe their sexual, gender and/or spiritual identity. As an umbrella term it may encompass same-sex attraction and a wide variety of gender variance, including people who might be described in Western culture as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual, transgender, gender queer, cross-dressers or who have multiple gender identities.” (read more lgbtqhealth.ca) Continue reading