The Shangri Las

The Shangri Las

The Shangri Las are a girl pop group from the 1960s, They were a bit different from other Girl Groups back then. (groups which name starts with The, similar dressed trio’s with two background singers etc.) because they came from Queens, New York which also was part of the ‘though’ image they had. The Shangri Las recorded songs about alienation, loneliness, abandonment and death, well all the stuff a teenager finds interesting…. Our personal favorites are ‘The leader of the pack’, ‘Sophisticated Boom Boom’ and ‘I Can Never Go Home Anymore’. We could only find one of our favorite songs on video, but never mind that; the girls are a feast to the eye in action, with their tight boots, big hair and shrilly voices. Have a nive day! xoxo Mimi



Yes! the ‘background’ singers are twins! Continue reading

The Golden Age of Girl Groups

The Golden Age of Girl Groups

The 1960s are the golden age of American girl pop groups. (the ones that sing) They came in three to four girls, wearing similar outfits, and sometimes even similair hairdo’s. The names of these groups started with The. The Marvelletes, The Chiffons, The Shirelles, The Ronettes, The Velvelettes, The Cookies, The Blossoms, The Exiters, The Shangri Las, The Dixie cups, The Sweet Inspirations, The Sensations, The Angels, The Orions, The Carefrees,The Jewels, The Chantels, and much much more (we’ve read that there were about 750 girl groups at one point)


Phil Spector was a big time producer of girl groups (The Ronettes, The Blossoms,The Crystals…) so was Motown (The Supremes, The Marvelettes, The Velvettes….) 60% of the top 100 singles released by girl groups during the sixties came from Hitsville, U.S.A., as Motown was called.

Songs were written by professionals (such as Carole King, Nicolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson, Neil Sedaka) who could custom fit the music and lyrics to the needs of te teenagers. Music was made (written, produced, sold, recorded, auditoned etc etc) in The Brill Building, it was the most prestigious address in New York for the music business

“Every day we squeezed into our respective cubby holes with just enough room for a piano, a bench, and maybe a chair for the lyricist if you were lucky. You’d sit there and write and you could hear someone in the next cubby hole composing a song exactly like yours. The pressure in the Brill Building was really terrific”
-Carole King Quoted in The Sociology of Rock by Simon Frith
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Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House

Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House

We, at Mimi Berlin, came to know about Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House via the Salone del Mobile 2017. On Instagram; we didn’t attend the Design Week this year because we missed our flight.  So this week we will be posting about venues, designs and other places we feel we really missed out on.

Image of yellow Futuro house via artsy.net if you are interested in trends spotting go to this site for some trend watching as well.

This flying saucer type of building is something we really wanted to see in real life. A yellow version stood in front of the Louis Vuitton Fondation at the Palazzo Bocconiin in Milan, where the newest designs for the Objets Nomades Collection were on display.

The Futuro House was designed in 1968 by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen. It was commissioned as a portable “holiday house” or ski chalet. Because it would be used in a mountainside setting, the structure needed to be easy to transport to the site, low maintenance and shed snow easily. The final design of the Futuro House met all those criteria. It’s just over 26 feet in diameter and came completely equipped with ctom furnishings that fit the interesting shape of this house. (read more at futurohouse.net)

Hiring the Futuro. Why think outside the box, when you can think inside a circle? Various forward looking companies and institutions have already taken the opportunity to use the  Futuro House as an inspirational and unique meeting or event space. “more info at futurohouse.co.uk

An other website devoted to documenting the history of the Futuro House and the current status and whereabouts of the remaining examples. thefuturohouse.com

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Eye-dentify with eyelashes

Eye-dentify with eyelashes

What kind of woman are you anyway; Eye-dentify with eyelashes. An advertisement from the sixties of the previous century, by Andrea. Andrea, the brand, we do not know. What we do know that eyelashes are equally important now, in 2017, as they were in the sixties.

We do love this image the women with the nude lipstick and black, big eyelashes, they are very intruiging! Just like the Kardashians; tacky but intruiging…..Just that! Have a nice day!

(image via hair-and-makeup-artist.com/)

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The Animals of Les Lalannes

The Animals of Les Lalannes

Well, some of them……mostly made in the sixties of the previous century

Les Lalannes are Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne, a French ‘designers couple’. Google them if you want to know more about these extraordinary minds…..

(via agentofstyle.comcore77.com / designersatelier.co.uk

Adaptive Travelers: Stairs to a Non-Existent Fourth Floor

Adaptive Travelers: Stairs to a Non-Existent Fourth Floor

We, Mimi Blogger Team, visited the Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven.
Being the fashion-angels that we are; we went straight to the fashion-exhibition named ‘Adaptive Travelers‘ (more on that HERE) The exhibition, by Modebelofte 2016, was held at the top floor of the Dutch luxury department store “De Bijenkorf” (‘The Beehive’ in Dutch).

But first we had to adapt ourselves to the intricate entrance route. Instead of just taking the store elevator (or escalator for that matter) we had to walk 3 flights of stairs, which are normally only used by employees, to the actual exhibition. After we exited the exhibition, via a parcours set on the roof (fun!), we saw the mysterious staircase leading to nowhere!!!

We find such a staircase very intruiging, this is the first time we’ve seen such an unfinished build in the Netherlands (which is a mini country with many, very strict rules). In 1960s ‘De Bijenkorf’ store only needed 3 stories, but urban planning was made for 4 stories. From the outside the fabulous building looks much taller than it actually is: the fourth floor is merely a facade. But the plans remain in the form of the stairs leading to nowhere! (Thahanks!! D. Martijn Oostra for this story)

The façade of the Dutch Departmentstore ‘De Bijenkorf” is designed by Giò Ponti (in cooperation withTheo Boosten, Frans Gaast and Mario Negri 1965/1968). Continue reading