Ladies who Collect Haute-Couture

Ladies who Collect Haute-Couture

Joy Venturini Bianchi, Danielle Luquet de Saint Germain, Mouna Ayoub, are collectors of Haute Couture fashion and at one point put (a part) of their private collection up for auction. (Joy Venturini Bianchi and Mouna Ayoub also are well kmown philanthropist’s. Danielle Luquet de Saint Germain was a muse to the late Yves Saint Laurent in the 1960s, and later an artistic advisor at Dior). Suzanne Saperstein (according to Vanity Fair in 2002 is the world’s biggest consumer of haute couture) donated a large sum to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for the study and display of 18th and 19th century European clothing.

The private haute couture collection of the Swiss born Eva Maria Hatschek is currently on show In Rotterdam

More haute couture auctions on this blog

Joy Venturini Bianchi at her 4-hour-fundraising at “the San Francisco’s Hedge Gallery, (October 20, 2015) a one-time opportunity to view 41 pieces from the philanthropist’s private collection, spanning six decades and more than two dozen designers, to benefit the developmentally disabled through Helpers, a cause and an organization with which Bianchi has been associated for 62 years.” (mages/read more WWD) You can shop at helpers-house-of-couture!

Danielle Luquet de Saint Germain, model and muse to Yves Saint Laurent, is to part ways with her extensive designer wardrobe later this year. [October 2013] As a muse to the late Yves Saint Laurent in the 1960s, and later an artistic advisor at Dior, Danielle Luquet de Saint Germain had ample opportunity to acquire the work of the most celebrated fashion designers of the era. As it turns out, she also collected haute couture pieces by the likes of Thierry Mugler, Azzedine Alaïa, and Christian Lacroix and is set to auction off her vast wardrobe later this year. Auctioneers Gros & Delettrez in Paris will sell around 350 lots on October 14, and continue holding sales every two to three months until the full 12,000-piece collection has been sold.” (read more fashion.telegraph ) (images via nydailynews  / theaustralian)

“Mouna Ayoub plans to donate 100,000 euros from the procees to the Musée des Arts Décoratifs de Paris to finance the upcoming exhibition on buttons, as well as another 100,000 euros to the Cinéfondation which supports young talent in the French movie industry. French auction house Maison Cornette de Saint Cyr in Paris between January 30 and Feb 2 2015, with a public viewing taking place January 24‑29. Lots include shoes, handbags, furs, cocktail dresses, and a few evening dresses, with estimates from as low as 40 euros rising to 30,000 euros.” (mages/read more blouinartinfo)

Suzanne Saperstein In 2002 Vanity Fair named her as the world’s biggest consumer of haute couture and 18th century furniture.
“With a single acquisition — quietly in the works for three years and made public today — the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has become a major center for the study and display of 18th and 19th century European clothing. The new addition of about 250 outfits and 300 accessories created between 1700 and 1915 includes men’s three-piece suits, women’s dresses, children’s garb and a vast array of shoes, hats, purses, shawls, fans and undergarments. Wonders of innovative design, meticulous construction and intricate needlework, they were painstakingly assembled over a quarter of a century by two European dealers. LACMA bought the collection with funds provided by Los Angeles philanthropist Suzanne Saperstein and other donors. As a matter of policy, the museum does not disclose the cost of acquisitions, but sources familiar with the European costume market said that this was a multimillion-dollar deal. Many of the ensembles would probably bring six-figure prices at auction because of their workmanship, condition and rarity.” (images/read more latimes)

(http://madame.lefigaro.fr/style/la-garde-robe-de-mouna-ayoub-mise-aux-encheres-300115-94146 /

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