Pioneers of Play Art

Pioneers of Play Art

We never heard of the term Play Art, but last week we found a site (the only one actually) which categorized art from the past 20th and 21st century with this term. According to Ernst Lurker of Playart.org it all started with Duchamp‘s Bicycle Wheel in 1903. The latest work on his site is by Lygia Clark made in 2013 (see image above) After seeing the art categorized by Ernst Lurker under “Play Art” we thought an exhibition on “Play Art” is a nice way for people who don’t like or “understand” art ’cause it should trigger you inner, curious, child. Mr Lurker of Playart.org already has a concept for a museum….

Playart is a new artform that calls for active participation of the viewer and it offers a range of different types of involvement. Some PlayArtists focus on shapes and structures, others rely on scientific techniques like mechanical principles, physics or digital technology. Whatever the elements, PlayArt aims to get the audience intensively engaged by creating a playful mindset, by enabling playful and creative activities, and by encouraging hands-on experimentation. It is the intention of PlayArtists that their works be touched, manipulated and experienced. Variable or movable sculptures can be rearranged or set into motion. PlayArt captures the viewer’s imagination, stimulates curiosity and gives rise to the joy of discovery and play.”(read more/via playart.org / kapsul.org)

“Brian Sutton-Smith, (1924 to 2015) was a play theorist who spent his lifetime attempting to discover the cultural significance of play in human life, arguing that any useful definition of play must apply to both adults and children. Sutton-Smith’s interdisciplinary approach included research into play history and cross cultural studies of play, as well as research in psychology, education, and folklore. He maintained that the interpretation of play must involve all of its forms, from child’s play to gambling, sports, festivals, imagination, and nonsense. “(read more wikipedia)

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